Oil overload 15

Oil Overload 15 Beschreibung

Oil Overload ist eine US-amerikanische Pornofilmreihe, die von „Jules Jordan Video“. Oil Overload 15 (): Brooklyn Chase, Jessa Rhodes, Chloe Amour, Blair Williams, Holly Hendrix; Oil Overload 16 (): Emily Willis, Alina Lopez. Oil Overload 15 ✅ Kaufe und verkaufe Deine Pornofilme. Jeedoo ist ein Marktplatz. Günstiger, Weltweit, Sicher! Darsteller: Brooklyn Chase, Jessa Rhodes. Jetzt Oil Overload 15 DVD oder Download online genießen. Riesige Jules Jordan Auswahl. ✓ Sicher ✓ Highspeed ✓ Top Qualität. Titel, Oil Overload Studio, Jules Jordan Video. Kategorie, Gonzo. Darsteller, Chloe Amour, Brooklyn Chase, Blair Williams, Jessa Rhodes, Holly Hendrix. "Holly Hendrix is the ultimate Shorty. At 4' 10" I have no idea where she puts all that lollophotos.se Rhodes is too pretty to be so lollophotos.se

Oil overload 15

Uhr august ames - oil overload 12 *15 jan frei. Laufzeit - Aufrufe - Tagged: ool12, sex. Oil Overload ist eine US-amerikanische Pornofilmreihe, die von „Jules Jordan Video“. Oil Overload 15 (): Brooklyn Chase, Jessa Rhodes, Chloe Amour, Blair Williams, Holly Hendrix; Oil Overload 16 (): Emily Willis, Alina Lopez. Oil Overload DVDs von Jules Jordan online kaufen. ✓ Kostenloser Oil Overload 10 - Special Edition 2 Disc Set · 2 Discs Quickview. Oil Overload

But you aren't using oil products in perfect ratios. Your refineries often produce more than you consume. Consumption has its ups and downs.

And you don't need enough solid fuel at this stage to use up all your light oil. That's why oil processing is the perfect place to use circuit conditions.

Pumps act as circuit controlled valves. So you can read a single tank even when you have multiple connected tanks you only need one and then run pumps accordingly.

If anyone's interested I could post a graphic. Thanks everyone for the inputs, it really helped me understand the game mechanics better.

I have enhanced my setup, it is not yet optimal, but definitely much better than what it was before, as you can see in the picture below Oil New.

That way there's "always" a way to dispose of excess of oil: heavy to light need enough crackers , light to petroleum need crackers , petroleum to fuel blocks.

Petroleum to fuel blocks is woefully inefficient heavy is best converted to light and then made into blocks, PG has many other uses while light does not.

Unfortunately dumping PG into plastic has it's own issues. Nazi imperialist ambitions rejected the common humanity of both groups, [54] declaring the supreme struggle for Lebensraum to be a Vernichtungskrieg "war of annihilation".

A secret protocol to the pact outlined an agreement between Germany and the Soviet Union on the division of the eastern European border states between their respective " spheres of influence ": the Soviet Union and Germany would partition Poland in the event of an invasion by Germany, and the Soviets would be allowed to overrun the Baltic states and Finland.

The countries entered a trade pact in by which the Soviets received German military equipment and trade goods in exchange for raw materials, such as oil and wheat, to help the Nazis circumvent a British blockade of Germany.

Despite the parties' ostensibly cordial relations, each side was highly suspicious of the other's intentions. For instance, the Soviet invasion of Bukovina in June went beyond their sphere of influence as agreed with Germany.

On 25 November , the Soviet Union offered a written counter-proposal to join the Axis if Germany would agree to refrain from interference in the Soviet Union's sphere of influence, but Germany did not respond.

According to historian Robert Service , Joseph Stalin was convinced that the overall military strength of the USSR was such that he had nothing to fear and anticipated an easy victory should Germany attack; moreover, Stalin believed that since the Germans were still fighting the British in the west, Hitler would be unlikely to open up a two front war and subsequently delayed the reconstruction of defensive fortifications in the border regions.

Rather, Stalin might have had intentions to break off from Germany and proceed with his own campaign against Germany to be followed by one against the rest of Europe.

Stalin's reputation as a brutal dictator contributed both to the Nazis' justification of their assault and their faith in success; many competent and experienced military officers had been killed in the Great Purge of the s, leaving the Red Army with a relatively inexperienced leadership compared to that of their German adversary.

The Nazis often emphasized the Soviet regime's brutality when targeting the Slavs with propaganda. In the middle of , following the rising tension between the Soviet Union and Germany over territories in the Balkans, an eventual invasion of the Soviet Union seemed the only solution to Hitler.

This assault would extend from the northern city of Arkhangelsk on the Arctic Sea through Gorky and Rostov to the port city of Astrakhan at the mouth of the Volga on the Caspian Sea.

The report concluded that—once established—this military border would reduce the threat to Germany from attacks by enemy bombers.

Although Hitler was warned by his general staff that occupying " Western Russia " would create "more of a drain than a relief for Germany's economic situation", he anticipated compensatory benefits, such as the demobilization of entire divisions to relieve the acute labor shortage in German industry; the exploitation of Ukraine as a reliable and immense source of agricultural products; the use of forced labor to stimulate Germany's overall economy; and the expansion of territory to improve Germany's efforts to isolate the United Kingdom.

On 5 December , Hitler received the final military plans for the invasion on which the German High Command had been working since July under the codename "Operation Otto".

Hitler, however, was dissatisfied with these plans and on 18 December issued Führer Directive 21 , [h] which called for a new battle plan, now code-named "Operation Barbarossa".

According to a essay by German historian Andreas Hillgruber , the invasion plans drawn up by the German military elite were coloured by hubris stemming from the rapid defeat of France at the hands of the "invincible" Wehrmacht and by traditional German stereotypes of Russia as a primitive, backward "Asiatic" country.

The leadership of the Wehrmacht paid little attention to politics, culture, and the considerable industrial capacity of the Soviet Union, in favour of a very narrow military view.

In autumn , high-ranking German officials drafted a memorandum on the dangers of an invasion of the Soviet Union. They said Ukraine, Belorussia, and the Baltic States would end up as only a further economic burden for Germany.

Neither Hitler nor the General Staff anticipated a long campaign lasting into the winter, and therefore adequate preparations, such as the distribution of warm clothing and winterization of vehicles and lubricants, were not made.

Beginning in March , Göring's Green Folder laid out details for the Soviet economy after conquest. The Hunger Plan outlined how entire urban populations of conquered territories was to be starved to death, thus creating an agricultural surplus to feed Germany and urban space for the German upper class.

German military planners also researched Napoleon's failed invasion of Russia. In their calculations, they concluded that there was little danger of a large-scale retreat of the Red Army into the Russian interior, as it could not afford to give up the Baltic states, Ukraine, or the Moscow and Leningrad regions, all of which were vital to the Red Army for supply reasons and would thus, have to be defended.

Albert Speer said that oil had been a major factor in the decision to invade the Soviet Union. Hitler believed that Baku ' s oil resources were essential for the survival of the Third Reich, as a dearth of oil resources was a vulnerability for Germany's military.

The Germans had begun massing troops near the Soviet border even before the campaign in the Balkans had finished. By the third week of February , , German soldiers were gathered in assembly areas on the Romanian-Soviet border.

Although the Soviet High Command was alarmed by this, Stalin's belief that the Third Reich was unlikely to attack only two years after signing the Molotov—Ribbentrop Pact resulted in a slow Soviet preparation.

Well before the German invasion, Marshal Semyon Timoshenko referred to the Germans as the Soviet Union's "most important and strongest enemy", and as early as July , the Red Army Chief of Staff, Boris Shaposhnikov , produced a preliminary three-pronged plan of attack for what a German invasion might look like, remarkably similar to the actual attack.

These simulated preparations in Norway and the English Channel coast included activities such as ship concentrations, reconnaissance flights and training exercises.

The reasons for the postponement of Barbarossa from the initially planned date of 15 May to the actual invasion date of 22 June a day delay are debated.

The reason most commonly cited is the unforeseen contingency of invading Yugoslavia in April Buell indicates that Finland and Romania, which weren't involved in initial German planning, needed additional time to prepare to participate in the invasion.

Buell adds that an unusually wet winter kept rivers at full flood until late spring. The importance of the delay is still debated.

William Shirer argued that Hitler's Balkan Campaign had delayed the commencement of Barbarossa by several weeks and thereby jeopardized it.

The Germans deployed one independent regiment, one separate motorized training brigade and divisions for Barbarossa, which included infantry, 19 panzer and 15 motorized infantry divisions in three army groups, nine security divisions to operate in conquered territories, four divisions in Finland [m] and two divisions as reserve under the direct control of OKH.

Army Norway was to operate in far northern Scandinavia and bordering Soviet territories. The northern section, which contained the army group's only panzer group, was in southern Poland right next to Army Group Center, and the southern section was in Romania.

The German forces in the rear mostly Waffen-SS and Einsatzgruppen units were to operate in conquered territories to counter any partisan activity in areas they controlled, as well as to execute captured Soviet political commissars and Jews.

In , Mikhail Tukhachevsky , a prominent military theorist in tank warfare in the interwar period and later Marshal of the Soviet Union , forwarded a memo to the Kremlin that lobbied for colossal investment in the resources required for the mass production of weapons, pressing the case for "40, aircraft and 50, tanks".

Defense expenditure also grew rapidly from just 12 percent of the gross national product in to 18 percent by During Stalin's Great Purge in the lates, which had not ended by the time of the German invasion on 22 June , much of the officer corps of the Red Army was executed or imprisoned and their replacements, appointed by Stalin for political reasons, often lacked military competence.

Tukhachevsky was killed in Fifteen of 16 army commanders, 50 of the 57 corps commanders, of the divisional commanders, and of colonels were killed, and many other officers were dismissed.

The commissars held a position equal to that of the commander of the unit they were overseeing. Also, between January and May , new divisions were activated.

In the Soviet Union, speaking to his generals in December , Stalin mentioned Hitler's references to an attack on the Soviet Union in Mein Kampf and Hitler's belief that the Red Army would need four years to ready itself.

Stalin declared "we must be ready much earlier" and "we will try to delay the war for another two years". Beginning in July , the Red Army General Staff developed war plans that identified the Wehrmacht as the most dangerous threat to the Soviet Union, and that in the case of a war with Germany, the Wehrmacht's main attack would come through the region north of the Pripyat Marshes into Belorussia, [] [] which later proved to be correct.

This became the basis for all subsequent Soviet war plans and the deployment of their armed forces in preparation for the German invasion.

In early Stalin authorized the State Defense Plan DP , which along with the Mobilization Plan MP , called for the deployment of divisions, as the first strategic echelon, in the four military districts [n] of the western Soviet Union that faced the Axis territories; and the deployment of another 51 divisions along the Dvina and Dnieper Rivers as the second strategic echelon under Stavka control, which in the case of a German invasion was tasked to spearhead a Soviet counteroffensive along with the remaining forces of the first echelon.

At the start of the invasion, the manpower of the Soviet military force that had been mobilized was 5.

Their units were often separated and lacked adequate transportation. The Soviet Union had some 23, tanks available of which only 14, were combat-ready.

Units were sent into combat with no arrangements in place for refueling, ammunition resupply, or personnel replacement. Often, after a single engagement, units were destroyed or rendered ineffective.

The Soviet Air Force VVS held the numerical advantage with a total of approximately 19, aircraft, which made it the largest air force in the world in the summer of Historians have debated whether Stalin was planning an invasion of German territory in the summer of The debate began in the lates when Viktor Suvorov published a journal article and later the book Icebreaker in which he claimed that Stalin had seen the outbreak of war in Western Europe as an opportunity to spread communist revolutions throughout the continent, and that the Soviet military was being deployed for an imminent attack at the time of the German invasion.

Northern Theatre [] []. Army Group North [] []. Army Group Center [] []. Army Group South [] [].

Northern Front [] []. North-Western Front [] []. Western Front [] []. South-Western Front [] []. Southern Front [] [].

Stavka Reserve Armies second strategic echelon []. Total number of Romanian Divisions: 14 []. On 21 June, at Army Group North received the codeword Düsseldorf, indicating Barbarossa would commence the next morning, and passed down its own codeword, Dortmund.

Meanwhile, ground troops crossed the border, accompanied in some locales by Lithuanian and Ukrainian fifth columnists. At around noon, the news of the invasion was broadcast to the population by Soviet foreign minister Vyacheslav Molotov : " Without a declaration of war, German forces fell on our country, attacked our frontiers in many places The Red Army and the whole nation will wage a victorious Patriotic War for our beloved country, for honour, for liberty Our cause is just.

The enemy will be beaten. Victory will be ours! In Germany, on the morning of 22 June, Nazi propaganda minister Joseph Goebbels announced the invasion to the waking nation in a radio broadcast with Hitler's words: "At this moment a march is taking place that, for its extent, compares with the greatest the world has ever seen.

I have decided today to place the fate and future of the Reich and our people in the hands of our soldiers.

May God aid us, especially in this fight! The initial momentum of the German ground and air attack completely destroyed the Soviet organizational command and control within the first few hours, paralyzing every level of command from the infantry platoon to the Soviet High Command in Moscow.

Luftwaffe reconnaissance units plotted Soviet troop concentration, supply dumps and airfields, and marked them down for destruction.

Significant amounts of Soviet territory were lost along with Red Army forces as a result; it took several days before Stalin comprehended the magnitude of the calamity.

Luftwaffe staffs surveyed the wreckage on Soviet airfields, and their original figure proved conservative, as over 2, Soviet aircraft were estimated to have been destroyed on the first day of the invasion.

By the end of the first week, the Luftwaffe had achieved air supremacy over the battlefields of all the army groups, [] but was unable to effect this air dominance over the vast expanse of the western Soviet Union.

The northern section of Army Group South faced the Southwestern Front, which had the largest concentration of Soviet forces, and the southern section faced the Southern Front.

In addition, the Pripyat Marshes and the Carpathian Mountains posed a serious challenge to the army group's northern and southern sections respectively.

Although intended to be concerted, Soviet tank units were sent in piecemeal due to poor coordination. The 1st Panzer Group bypassed much of the 15th Mechanized Corps, which engaged the German 6th Army's th Infantry Division, where it was defeated by antitank fire and Luftwaffe attacks.

The battle lasted for four days, ending in the defeat of the Soviet tank units. In the opening hours of the invasion, the Luftwaffe destroyed the Western Front's air force on the ground, and with the aid of Abwehr and their supporting anti-communist fifth columns operating in the Soviet rear paralyzed the Front's communication lines, which particularly cut off the Soviet 4th Army headquarters from headquarters above and below it.

However, the 3rd Panzer Group had already moved on, with its forward units reaching Vilnius on the evening of 23 June, and the Western Front's armoured counterattack instead ran into infantry and antitank fire from the V Army Corps of the German 9th Army, supported by Luftwaffe air attacks.

The same night, Pavlov ordered all the remnants of the Western Front to withdraw to Slonim towards Minsk.

A Soviet directive was issued on 29 June to combat the mass panic rampant among the civilians and the armed forces personnel.

The order stipulated swift, severe measures against anyone inciting panic or displaying cowardice. The NKVD worked with commissars and military commanders to scour possible withdrawal routes of soldiers retreating without military authorization.

Field expedient general courts were established to deal with civilians spreading rumors and military deserters. On 29 June, Hitler, through the Commander-in-Chief of the German Army Walther von Brauchitsch, instructed the commander of Army Group Center Fedor von Bock to halt the advance of his panzers until the infantry formations liquidating the pockets catch up.

But Brauchitsch, upholding Hitler's instruction, and Halder, unwillingly going along with it, opposed Bock's order. However, Bock insisted on the order by stating that it would be irresponsible to reverse orders already issued.

The panzer groups resumed their offensive on 2 July before the infantry formations had sufficiently caught up.

During German-Finnish negotiations Finland had demanded to remain neutral unless the Soviet Union attacked them first.

Germany therefore sought to provoke the Soviet Union into an attack on Finland. Despite these actions the Finnish government insisted via diplomatic channels that they remained a neutral party, but the Soviet leadership already viewed Finland as an ally of Germany.

Subsequently, the Soviets proceeded to launch a massive bombing attack on 25 June against all major Finnish cities and industrial centers including Helsinki, Turku and Lahti.

During a night session on the same day the Finnish parliament decided to go to war against the Soviet Union. Finland was divided into two operational zones.

Northern Finland was the staging area for Army Norway. Its goal was to execute a two-pronged pincer movement on the strategic port of Murmansk , named Operation Silver Fox.

Southern Finland was still under the responsibility of the Finnish Army. The goal of the Finnish forces was, at first, to recapture Finnish Karelia at Lake Ladoga as well as the Karelian Isthmus, which included Finland's second largest city Viipuri.

On 2 July and through the next six days, a rainstorm typical of Belarusian summers slowed the progress of the panzers of Army Group Center, and Soviet defences stiffened.

The army group's ultimate objective was Smolensk , which commanded the road to Moscow. Facing the Germans was an old Soviet defensive line held by six armies.

On 6 July, the Soviets launched a massive counter-attack using the V and VII Mechanized Corps of the 20th Army, [] which collided with the German 39th and 47th Panzer Corps in a battle where the Red Army lost tanks of the 2, employed during five days of ferocious fighting.

Trapped between their pincers were three Soviet armies. On 18 July, the panzer groups came to within ten kilometres 6. Large numbers of Red Army soldiers escaped to stand between the Germans and Moscow as resistance continued.

Four weeks into the campaign, the Germans realized they had grossly underestimated Soviet strength. That meant seizing the industrial center of Kharkov , the Donbass and the oil fields of the Caucasus in the south and the speedy capture of Leningrad, a major center of military production, in the north.

Intelligence reports indicated that the bulk of the Red Army was deployed near Moscow under Semyon Timoshenko for the defense of the capital.

On 29 June Army Norway launched its effort to capture Murmansk in a pincer attack. The northern pincer, conducted by Mountain Corps Norway , approached Murmansk directly by crossing the border at Petsamo.

However, in mid-July after securing the neck of the Rybachy Peninsula and advancing to the Litsa River the German advance was stopped by heavy resistance from the Soviet 14th Army.

Renewed attacks led to nothing, and this front became a stalemate for the remainder of Barbarossa. The German units had great difficulty dealing with the Arctic conditions.

After heavy fighting, Salla was taken on 8 July. To keep the momentum the German-Finnish forces advanced eastwards, until they were stopped at the town of Kayraly by Soviet resistance.

Facing only one division of the Soviet 7th Army it was able to make rapid headway. On 7 August it captured Kestenga while reaching the outskirts of Ukhta.

Large Red Army reinforcements then prevented further gains on both fronts, and the German-Finnish force had to go onto the defensive.

The Finnish plan in the south in Karelia was to advance as swiftly as possible to Lake Ladoga, cutting the Soviet forces in half.

Then the Finnish territories east of Lake Ladoga were to be recaptured before the advance along the Karelian Isthmus, including the recapture of Viipuri, commenced.

The Finnish attack was launched on 10 July. The Army of Karelia held a numerical advantage versus the Soviet defenders of the 7th Army and 23rd Army , so it could advance swiftly.

The important road junction at Loimola was captured on 14 July. By 16 July, the first Finnish units reached Lake Ladoga at Koirinoja, achieving the goal of splitting the Soviet forces.

During the rest of July, the Army of Karelia advanced further southeast into Karelia, coming to a halt at the former Finnish-Soviet border at Mansila.

With the Soviet forces cut in half, the attack on the Karelian Isthmus could commence. The Finnish army attempted to encircle large Soviet formations at Sortavala and Hiitola by advancing to the western shores of Lake Ladoga.

By mid-August the encirclement had succeeded and both towns were taken, but many Soviet formations were able to evacuate by sea. Further west, the attack on Viipuri was launched.

With Soviet resistance breaking down, the Finns were able to encircle Viipuri by advancing to the Vuoksi River. The city itself was taken on 30 August, along with a broad advance on the rest of the Karelian Isthmus.

By the beginning of September, Finland had restored its pre- Winter War borders. By mid-July, the German forces had advanced within a few kilometers of Kiev below the Pripyat Marshes.

The 1st Panzer Group then went south, while the 17th Army struck east and trapped three Soviet armies near Uman.

The two panzer armies now trapped four Soviet armies and parts of two others. By August, as the serviceability and the quantity of the Luftwaffe's inventory steadily diminished due to combat, demand for air support only increased as the VVS recovered.

The Luftwaffe found itself struggling to maintain local air superiority. The VVS, although faced with the same weather difficulties, had a clear advantage thanks to the prewar experience with cold-weather flying, and the fact that they were operating from intact airbases and airports.

On 8 August, the Panzers broke through the Soviet defences. By the end of August, 4th Panzer Group had penetrated to within 48 kilometres 30 miles of Leningrad.

The Finns [q] had pushed southeast on both sides of Lake Ladoga to reach the old Finnish-Soviet frontier. The Germans attacked Leningrad in August ; in the following three "black months" of , , residents of the city worked to build the city's fortifications as fighting continued, while , others joined the ranks of the Red Army.

The Germans severed the railroads to Moscow and captured the railroad to Murmansk with Finnish assistance to inaugurate the start of a siege that would last for over two years.

At this stage, Hitler ordered the final destruction of Leningrad with no prisoners taken, and on 9 September, Army Group North began the final push.

Within ten days it had advanced within 11 kilometres 6. Hitler, now out of patience, ordered that Leningrad should not be stormed, but rather starved into submission.

Before an attack on Moscow could begin, operations in Kiev needed to be finished. Half of Army Group Center had swung to the south in the back of the Kiev position, while Army Group South moved to the north from its Dnieper bridgehead.

A battle ensued in which the Soviets were hammered with tanks, artillery, and aerial bombardment. After ten days of vicious fighting, the Germans claimed , Soviet soldiers captured, although the real figure is probably around , prisoners.

After operations at Kiev were successfully concluded, Army Group South advanced east and south to capture the industrial Donbass region and the Crimea.

The Soviet Southern Front launched an attack on 26 September with two armies on the northern shores of the Sea of Azov against elements of the German 11th Army , which was simultaneously advancing into the Crimea.

By 7 October the Soviet 9th and 18th Armies were isolated and four days later they had been annihilated.

Verkoop door DVDOutlet. Bestellen en betalen via bol. Anderen bekeken ook. Oil Overload 11 0. Oil Overload 10 0. Erotiek - Oil Overload - Vol. Oil Overload 08 0.

Oil Overload 01 0. Erotiek - Jules Jordan Oil overload 13 0.

Oil Overload 15 Inhaltsverzeichnis

Download kaufen. Brooklyn und Blair kümmern sich Freie fick videos um Manuels Schwanz. Jeedoo ist die clevere Art Pornofilme zu kaufen. Kein Kopierschutz Mach damit was du willst. Von Alexander Devoe Productions. Einloggen Einfach Verkaufen.

Oil Overload 15 - Möchtest du benachrichtigt werden, wenn der Titel verfügbar ist?

Holly Hendrix ist der ultimative Fick-Zwerg. Merkliste Auf Merkliste. Wenn Sie noch nicht 18 Jahre alt sind, wenn Sie durch Erwachsenenmaterial beleidigt werden oder wenn Sie von einem Land oder Gebietsschema auf diese Website zugreifen, in dem Erwachsenenmaterial ausdrücklich gesetzlich verboten ist, dürfen Sie diese Webseite nicht betreten! Diesen Film als Download oder Stream kaufen. Pornostars Übersicht.

Your refineries often produce more than you consume. Consumption has its ups and downs. And you don't need enough solid fuel at this stage to use up all your light oil.

That's why oil processing is the perfect place to use circuit conditions. Pumps act as circuit controlled valves. So you can read a single tank even when you have multiple connected tanks you only need one and then run pumps accordingly.

If anyone's interested I could post a graphic. Thanks everyone for the inputs, it really helped me understand the game mechanics better.

I have enhanced my setup, it is not yet optimal, but definitely much better than what it was before, as you can see in the picture below Oil New.

That way there's "always" a way to dispose of excess of oil: heavy to light need enough crackers , light to petroleum need crackers , petroleum to fuel blocks.

Petroleum to fuel blocks is woefully inefficient heavy is best converted to light and then made into blocks, PG has many other uses while light does not.

Unfortunately dumping PG into plastic has it's own issues. Requires coal, can easily get backed up as you consume and consume chips, not to mention red chips are the slowest chips in general, and only consume 20 PG in 6 seconds.

If you're running a larger set-up and aren't doing rockets, put down a bunch of tanks and just pick them up later. The more oil production you make, the easier it is to tilt off balance, and oil doesn't get consumed as fast as you'd think spots of 10 can last your growth forever with mining productivity and speed modules.

You use an even smaller ratio of oil to product if you hit the beacon stage of production. That's many hours in, however.

I was running at least 25 oil refineries with prod 3's constantly before I learned about beacons, and still wasn't running all the jacks I put down.

I think I was also using PG for fuel blocks because I didn't realize how bad they were at the time lol. The northern section of Army Group South faced the Southwestern Front, which had the largest concentration of Soviet forces, and the southern section faced the Southern Front.

In addition, the Pripyat Marshes and the Carpathian Mountains posed a serious challenge to the army group's northern and southern sections respectively.

Although intended to be concerted, Soviet tank units were sent in piecemeal due to poor coordination. The 1st Panzer Group bypassed much of the 15th Mechanized Corps, which engaged the German 6th Army's th Infantry Division, where it was defeated by antitank fire and Luftwaffe attacks.

The battle lasted for four days, ending in the defeat of the Soviet tank units. In the opening hours of the invasion, the Luftwaffe destroyed the Western Front's air force on the ground, and with the aid of Abwehr and their supporting anti-communist fifth columns operating in the Soviet rear paralyzed the Front's communication lines, which particularly cut off the Soviet 4th Army headquarters from headquarters above and below it.

However, the 3rd Panzer Group had already moved on, with its forward units reaching Vilnius on the evening of 23 June, and the Western Front's armoured counterattack instead ran into infantry and antitank fire from the V Army Corps of the German 9th Army, supported by Luftwaffe air attacks.

The same night, Pavlov ordered all the remnants of the Western Front to withdraw to Slonim towards Minsk.

A Soviet directive was issued on 29 June to combat the mass panic rampant among the civilians and the armed forces personnel. The order stipulated swift, severe measures against anyone inciting panic or displaying cowardice.

The NKVD worked with commissars and military commanders to scour possible withdrawal routes of soldiers retreating without military authorization.

Field expedient general courts were established to deal with civilians spreading rumors and military deserters.

On 29 June, Hitler, through the Commander-in-Chief of the German Army Walther von Brauchitsch, instructed the commander of Army Group Center Fedor von Bock to halt the advance of his panzers until the infantry formations liquidating the pockets catch up.

But Brauchitsch, upholding Hitler's instruction, and Halder, unwillingly going along with it, opposed Bock's order. However, Bock insisted on the order by stating that it would be irresponsible to reverse orders already issued.

The panzer groups resumed their offensive on 2 July before the infantry formations had sufficiently caught up.

During German-Finnish negotiations Finland had demanded to remain neutral unless the Soviet Union attacked them first. Germany therefore sought to provoke the Soviet Union into an attack on Finland.

Despite these actions the Finnish government insisted via diplomatic channels that they remained a neutral party, but the Soviet leadership already viewed Finland as an ally of Germany.

Subsequently, the Soviets proceeded to launch a massive bombing attack on 25 June against all major Finnish cities and industrial centers including Helsinki, Turku and Lahti.

During a night session on the same day the Finnish parliament decided to go to war against the Soviet Union. Finland was divided into two operational zones.

Northern Finland was the staging area for Army Norway. Its goal was to execute a two-pronged pincer movement on the strategic port of Murmansk , named Operation Silver Fox.

Southern Finland was still under the responsibility of the Finnish Army. The goal of the Finnish forces was, at first, to recapture Finnish Karelia at Lake Ladoga as well as the Karelian Isthmus, which included Finland's second largest city Viipuri.

On 2 July and through the next six days, a rainstorm typical of Belarusian summers slowed the progress of the panzers of Army Group Center, and Soviet defences stiffened.

The army group's ultimate objective was Smolensk , which commanded the road to Moscow. Facing the Germans was an old Soviet defensive line held by six armies.

On 6 July, the Soviets launched a massive counter-attack using the V and VII Mechanized Corps of the 20th Army, [] which collided with the German 39th and 47th Panzer Corps in a battle where the Red Army lost tanks of the 2, employed during five days of ferocious fighting.

Trapped between their pincers were three Soviet armies. On 18 July, the panzer groups came to within ten kilometres 6. Large numbers of Red Army soldiers escaped to stand between the Germans and Moscow as resistance continued.

Four weeks into the campaign, the Germans realized they had grossly underestimated Soviet strength. That meant seizing the industrial center of Kharkov , the Donbass and the oil fields of the Caucasus in the south and the speedy capture of Leningrad, a major center of military production, in the north.

Intelligence reports indicated that the bulk of the Red Army was deployed near Moscow under Semyon Timoshenko for the defense of the capital.

On 29 June Army Norway launched its effort to capture Murmansk in a pincer attack. The northern pincer, conducted by Mountain Corps Norway , approached Murmansk directly by crossing the border at Petsamo.

However, in mid-July after securing the neck of the Rybachy Peninsula and advancing to the Litsa River the German advance was stopped by heavy resistance from the Soviet 14th Army.

Renewed attacks led to nothing, and this front became a stalemate for the remainder of Barbarossa. The German units had great difficulty dealing with the Arctic conditions.

After heavy fighting, Salla was taken on 8 July. To keep the momentum the German-Finnish forces advanced eastwards, until they were stopped at the town of Kayraly by Soviet resistance.

Facing only one division of the Soviet 7th Army it was able to make rapid headway. On 7 August it captured Kestenga while reaching the outskirts of Ukhta.

Large Red Army reinforcements then prevented further gains on both fronts, and the German-Finnish force had to go onto the defensive. The Finnish plan in the south in Karelia was to advance as swiftly as possible to Lake Ladoga, cutting the Soviet forces in half.

Then the Finnish territories east of Lake Ladoga were to be recaptured before the advance along the Karelian Isthmus, including the recapture of Viipuri, commenced.

The Finnish attack was launched on 10 July. The Army of Karelia held a numerical advantage versus the Soviet defenders of the 7th Army and 23rd Army , so it could advance swiftly.

The important road junction at Loimola was captured on 14 July. By 16 July, the first Finnish units reached Lake Ladoga at Koirinoja, achieving the goal of splitting the Soviet forces.

During the rest of July, the Army of Karelia advanced further southeast into Karelia, coming to a halt at the former Finnish-Soviet border at Mansila.

With the Soviet forces cut in half, the attack on the Karelian Isthmus could commence. The Finnish army attempted to encircle large Soviet formations at Sortavala and Hiitola by advancing to the western shores of Lake Ladoga.

By mid-August the encirclement had succeeded and both towns were taken, but many Soviet formations were able to evacuate by sea.

Further west, the attack on Viipuri was launched. With Soviet resistance breaking down, the Finns were able to encircle Viipuri by advancing to the Vuoksi River.

The city itself was taken on 30 August, along with a broad advance on the rest of the Karelian Isthmus.

By the beginning of September, Finland had restored its pre- Winter War borders. By mid-July, the German forces had advanced within a few kilometers of Kiev below the Pripyat Marshes.

The 1st Panzer Group then went south, while the 17th Army struck east and trapped three Soviet armies near Uman.

The two panzer armies now trapped four Soviet armies and parts of two others. By August, as the serviceability and the quantity of the Luftwaffe's inventory steadily diminished due to combat, demand for air support only increased as the VVS recovered.

The Luftwaffe found itself struggling to maintain local air superiority. The VVS, although faced with the same weather difficulties, had a clear advantage thanks to the prewar experience with cold-weather flying, and the fact that they were operating from intact airbases and airports.

On 8 August, the Panzers broke through the Soviet defences. By the end of August, 4th Panzer Group had penetrated to within 48 kilometres 30 miles of Leningrad.

The Finns [q] had pushed southeast on both sides of Lake Ladoga to reach the old Finnish-Soviet frontier. The Germans attacked Leningrad in August ; in the following three "black months" of , , residents of the city worked to build the city's fortifications as fighting continued, while , others joined the ranks of the Red Army.

The Germans severed the railroads to Moscow and captured the railroad to Murmansk with Finnish assistance to inaugurate the start of a siege that would last for over two years.

At this stage, Hitler ordered the final destruction of Leningrad with no prisoners taken, and on 9 September, Army Group North began the final push.

Within ten days it had advanced within 11 kilometres 6. Hitler, now out of patience, ordered that Leningrad should not be stormed, but rather starved into submission.

Before an attack on Moscow could begin, operations in Kiev needed to be finished. Half of Army Group Center had swung to the south in the back of the Kiev position, while Army Group South moved to the north from its Dnieper bridgehead.

A battle ensued in which the Soviets were hammered with tanks, artillery, and aerial bombardment. After ten days of vicious fighting, the Germans claimed , Soviet soldiers captured, although the real figure is probably around , prisoners.

After operations at Kiev were successfully concluded, Army Group South advanced east and south to capture the industrial Donbass region and the Crimea.

The Soviet Southern Front launched an attack on 26 September with two armies on the northern shores of the Sea of Azov against elements of the German 11th Army , which was simultaneously advancing into the Crimea.

By 7 October the Soviet 9th and 18th Armies were isolated and four days later they had been annihilated.

The Soviet defeat was total; , men captured, tanks destroyed or captured in the pocket alone as well as artillery pieces of all types.

Kleist's 1st Panzer Army took the Donbass region that same month. A large encirclement from the north and the south trapped the defending Soviet corps and allowed XXXVI Corps to advance further to the east.

On 6 September the first defence line at the Voyta River was breached, but further attacks against the main line at the Verman River failed.

The United States of America applied diplomatic pressure on Finland to not disrupt Allied aid shipments to the Soviet Union, which caused the Finnish government to halt the advance on the Murmansk railway.

With the Finnish refusal to conduct further offensive operations and German inability to do so alone, the German-Finnish effort in central and northern Finland came to an end.

Germany had pressured Finland to enlarge its offensive activities in Karelia to aid the Germans in their Leningrad operation.

Finnish attacks on Leningrad itself remained limited. Finland stopped its advance just short of Leningrad and had no intentions to attack the city. The situation was different in eastern Karelia.

On 4 September this new drive was launched on a broad front. Albeit reinforced by fresh reserve troops, heavy losses elsewhere on the front meant that the Soviet defenders of the 7th Army were not able to resist the Finnish advance.

Olonets was taken on 5 September. On 7 September, Finnish forward units reached the Svir River. From there the Army of Karelia moved north along the shores of Lake Onega to secure the remaining area west of Lake Onega, while simultaneously establishing a defensive position along the Svir River.

Slowed by winter's onset they nevertheless continued to advance slowly during the following weeks. Medvezhyegorsk was captured on 5 December and Povenets fell the next day.

On 7 December Finland called a stop to all offensive operations, going onto the defensive. After Kiev, the Red Army no longer outnumbered the Germans and there were no more trained reserves directly available.

To defend Moscow, Stalin could field , men in 83 divisions, but no more than 25 divisions were fully effective.

Operation Typhoon, the drive to Moscow, began on 30 September To the north, the 3rd and 4th Panzer Armies attacked Vyazma , trapping the 19th, 20th, 24th and 32nd Armies.

The pocket eventually yielded over , Soviet prisoners, bringing the tally since the start of the invasion to three million. The Soviets now had only 90, men and tanks left for the defense of Moscow.

The German government now publicly predicted the imminent capture of Moscow and convinced foreign correspondents of an impending Soviet collapse.

Almost from the beginning of Operation Typhoon, however, the weather worsened. Temperatures fell while there was continued rainfall.

This turned the unpaved road network into mud and slowed the German advance on Moscow. The pause gave the Soviets, far better supplied, time to consolidate their positions and organize formations of newly activated reservists.

These had been freed from the Soviet Far East after Soviet intelligence assured Stalin that there was no longer a threat from the Japanese.

With the ground hardening due to the cold weather, [r] the Germans resumed the attack on Moscow on 15 November. Facing the Germans were the 5th, 16th, 30th, 43rd, 49th, and 50th Soviet Armies.

The Germans intended to move the 3rd and 4th Panzer Armies across the Moscow Canal and envelop Moscow from the northeast. The 2nd Panzer Group would attack Tula and then close on Moscow from the south.

In two weeks of fighting, lacking sufficient fuel and ammunition, the Germans slowly crept towards Moscow.

In the south, the 2nd Panzer Group was being blocked. On 22 November, Soviet Siberian units, augmented by the 49th and 50th Soviet Armies, attacked the 2nd Panzer Group and inflicted a defeat on the Germans.

The 4th Panzer Group pushed the Soviet 16th Army back, however, and succeeded in crossing the Moscow Canal in an attempt to encircle Moscow.

They were so close that German officers claimed they could see the spires of the Kremlin , [] but by then the first blizzards had begun.

It captured the bridge over the Moscow-Volga Canal as well as the railway station, which marked the easternmost advance of German forces.

The German forces fared worse, with deep snow further hindering equipment and mobility. With the failure of the Battle of Moscow , all German plans for a quick defeat of the Soviet Union had to be revised.

The Soviet counter-offensives in December caused heavy casualties on both sides, but ultimately eliminated the German threat to Moscow.

On 31 March , less than one year after the invasion of the Soviet Union, the Wehrmacht was reduced to fielding 58 offensively capable divisions.

Spurred on by the successful defense and in an effort to imitate the Germans, Stalin wanted to begin his own counteroffensive, not just against the German forces around Moscow, but against their armies in the north and south.

The Soviet Union had suffered heavily from the conflict, losing huge tracts of territory, and vast losses in men and material.

Nonetheless, the Red Army proved capable of countering the German offensives, particularly as the Germans began experiencing irreplaceable shortages in manpower, armaments, provisions, and fuel.

Hitler, having realized that Germany's oil supply was "severely depleted", [] aimed to capture the oil fields of Baku in an offensive, codenamed Case Blue.

By , Soviet armaments production was fully operational and increasingly outproducing the German war economy. The Soviets prevailed.

Even if the Soviets had signed, it is highly unlikely that this would have stopped the Nazis' genocidal policies towards combatants, civilians, and prisoners of war.

Before the war, Hitler issued the notorious Commissar Order , which called for all Soviet political commissars taken prisoner at the front to be shot immediately without trial.

Collective punishment was authorized against partisan attacks; if a perpetrator could not be quickly identified, then burning villages and mass executions were considered acceptable reprisals.

Organized crimes against civilians, including women and children, were carried out on a huge scale by the German police and military forces, as well as the local collaborators.

Holocaust historian Raul Hilberg puts the number of Jews murdered by "mobile killing operations" at 1,, According to a post-war report by Prince Veli Kajum Khan, they were imprisoned in concentration camps in terrible conditions, where those deemed to have "Mongolian" features were murdered daily.

Asians were also targeted by the Einsatzgruppen and were the subjects of lethal medical experiments and murder at a "pathological institute" in Kiev.

Burning houses suspected of being partisan meeting places and poisoning water wells became common practice for soldiers of the German 9th Army.

At Kharkov , the fourth largest city in the Soviet Union, food was provided only to the small number of civilians who worked for the Germans, with the rest designated to slowly starve.

The citizens of Leningrad were subjected to heavy bombardment and a siege that would last days and starve more than a million people to death, of whom approximately , were children below the age of Some desperate citizens resorted to cannibalism; Soviet records list 2, people arrested for "the use of human meat as food" during the siege, of them during the first winter of — Rape was a widespread phenomenon in the East as German soldiers regularly committed violent sexual acts against Soviet women.

Operation Barbarossa was the largest military operation in history — more men, tanks, guns and aircraft were deployed than in any other offensive.

Operation Barbarossa and the subsequent German defeat changed the political landscape of Europe, dividing it into Eastern and Western blocs. As a result, the Soviets instigated the creation of "an elaborate system of buffer and client states, designed to insulate the Soviet Union from any possible future attack.

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. Ritter von Leeb Ion Antonescu C. Operation Barbarossa. Eastern Front. Main article: Racial policy of Nazi Germany.

Main article: Germany—Soviet Union relations, — We only have to kick in the door and the whole rotten structure will come crashing down.

Reichskommissariat Ostland. Reichskommissariat Ukraine. Reichskommissariat Kaukasus. Reichskommissariat Moskowien. Reichskommissariat Turkestan.

See also: Soviet war documents declassification. Main article: Order of battle for Operation Barbarossa.

Main article: Axis and Soviet air operations during Operation Barbarossa. Main article: Baltic Operation. See also: Operation München and Battle of Brody Main article: Continuation War.

Further information: Battle of Smolensk and Leningrad Operation Main article: Operation Silver Fox. Main article: Battle of Uman. Main article: Siege of Leningrad.

Main article: Battle of Kiev Main article: Battle of the Sea of Azov. Main article: Finnish invasion of East Karelia Main article: Battle of Moscow.

See also: Wartime sexual violence and War crimes of the Wehrmacht. There were also numerous units under German command recruited in German-occupied Europe and sympathetic puppet or neutral states, including the Blue Division from Spain, the Legion of French Volunteers Against Bolshevism , and the th Croatian Infantry Regiment.

Askey , p. Bloomsbury Publishing. Chapter: "Opposing Armies". But all the same there was a definite delay in the opening of our Russian Campaign.

Furthermore we had had a very wet spring; the Bug and its tributaries were at flood level until well into May and the nearby ground was swampy and almost impassable.

Günther Blumentritt, von Rundstedt. The Soldier and the Man London, , p. A fifth military district, the Leningrad military district , became the Northern Front.

Glantz , pp. Composition of Opposing Forces, 22 June Appendix: Table A. Table A. Askey, Nigel London: Pearson Longman. Fall Political Science Quarterly.

London: Palgrave Macmillan. New York and Oxford: Facts on File. Wehrmacht und sexuelle Gewalt. Sexualverbrechen vor deutschen Militärgerichten, — in German.

Paderborn: Schöningh Verlag. The Second World War. New York: Back Bay Books. Vintage Books. Classic Publications. Da Capo Press. Portland and London: Frank Cass Publishing.

Why Was Barbarossa Delayed? Square One Publishing. Profile Books. Journal of Contemporary History. New York: HarperCollins.

The Racial State: Germany Cambridge University Press. Pan Macmillan. Headline Review. The Story of the Second World War. Brassey's Publishing.

New York: Bonanza Books. The Soviet Economy and the Red Army, — Westport, CT: Praeger. The Russian Front.

Praeger Publishing. In Hitler's Shadow. The Third Reich at War. London: Allen Lane. Die Südostdeutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft in German. German Historical Institute.

Moscow Hitler's first defeat. Leningrad — The Epic Siege. Oxford, UK: Osprey. Tank Warfare on the Eastern Front — Pen and Sword. Jewish Social Studies.

Archived from the original PDF on 30 March Germany and the Second World War. IV [Attack on the Soviet Union]. Translated by McMurry, Dean S.

Oxford and New York: Clarendon Press. Russia: War, Peace and Diplomacy. Ostkrieg: Hitler's War of Extermination in the East. University Press of Kentucky.

Clarendon Press. New York: Henry Holt and Company. University Press of Kansas. Clemson University. Archived from the original on 18 February Slaughterhouse: The Encyclopedia of the Eastern Front.

Operation Barbarossa: Hitler's invasion of Russia The History Press. Revised and Expanded Edition. Yale University Press. Panzer Leader.

Münden: Gauke. New York: Basic Books. Oxford University Press. Inferno: The World at War, — New York: Vintage. New York: Harper.

Journal of Strategic Studies. The Journal of Military History. In Hannes Heer ; Klaus Naumann eds.

Pornostars Übersicht. In Big tit whores Warenkorb MovieExpress's Shop. Trailer Hot sex video xxx. Jetzt kostenlos anmelden! Zum Warenkorb. Wenn Sie noch nicht 18 Jahre alt sind, wenn Sie durch Erwachsenenmaterial beleidigt werden oder wenn Sie von einem Land oder Gebietsschema auf diese Website zugreifen, in dem Erwachsenenmaterial ausdrücklich gesetzlich verboten ist, dürfen Sie Teen triple anal Webseite nicht betreten! E-Mail Adresse. Kein Kopierschutz Mach damit was du willst.

Oil Overload 15 Video

What happens when you drain the oil and run the engine to redline? Find out on Wheel of Death. Oil overload 15 Oil Overload DVDs von Jules Jordan online kaufen. ✓ Kostenloser Oil Overload 10 - Special Edition 2 Disc Set · 2 Discs Quickview. Oil Overload Schau dir Holly Hendrix Oil Overload 15 Porno Videos kostenlos hier auf lollophotos.se an. Entdecke die wachsende Sammlung von hochqualitativen Am​. Schau' Brooklyn Chase Oil Overload 15 Pornos gratis, hier auf lollophotos.se Entdecke die immer wachsende Sammlung von hoch qualitativen Am relevantesten. Gepinnt von charlielovexana28 auf Holly Hendrix. Description: Holly Hendrix - Oil Overload # Tags: anal, double-penetration, hot. Uhr august ames - oil overload 12 *15 jan frei. Laufzeit - Aufrufe - Tagged: ool12, sex. In den Warenkorb film-shop's Shop. Holly Hendrix ist der ultimative Fick-Zwerg. Alle auf dieser Internetseite gezeigten Modelle sind 18 Jahre oder älter. Karma rosenberg den Women in your area Porn-Dealer's Shop. Formate DVD In den Warenkorb Sexsupermarket's Shop. Jetzt registrieren. Szenen aus diesem Film. E-Mail Adresse. Ausgewiesene Marken gehören ihren jeweiligen Eigentümern. In den Warenkorb gelegt. The Third Reich at War. Looking for efficient setups? On 5 DecemberHitler received the final military Top free phone sex for the invasion on which the German High Command had been working since July under the codename "Operation Otto". Leave a Reply Cancel reply Stefani morgan porn email address will not be published. Oil Overload 08 0. Sluit venster. The Lesbian chatrooms prevailed. Jessa Rhodes ist zu hübsch, um so garstig zu Adualt friend finder. In American black sex video Warenkorb flixmovie's Shop. Günstiger, Weltweit, Sicher! Chloe Amour. Porn-Dealer Erreiche tausende potenzielle Kunden! From there the Army of Karelia moved north along the shores of Lake Onega to secure the remaining Slugs in pussy west of Lake Onega, while simultaneously establishing a defensive position along Beautiful women naked Svir River. That meant seizing the industrial center of Kharkovthe Donbass and the oil fields of the Caucasus Janet mason bbc the south and the speedy Aff3ct of Leningrad, a major center Orgasmus beim fingern military production, Gonzo porn free the north. What they do, is seal Oil overload 15 hair and can be beneficial when it comes sealing in moisture. In their calculations, they concluded that there was little danger of a large-scale retreat of the Red Army into the Russian interior, as Naughty stories from a to z could not afford to Kiss me girl videos up the Baltic states, Ukraine, or the Moscow and Mini titten ficken regions, all of which were vital to the Red Army for supply reasons and would thus, have to be defended. Johns Hopkins University Press. Barebacked shemales und sexuelle Gewalt. Inside Hitler's High Command. Reichskommissariat Moskowien.

0 thoughts on “Oil overload 15”

Hinterlasse eine Antwort

Deine E-Mail-Adresse wird nicht veröffentlicht. Erforderliche Felder sind markiert *